Poll

Would you go back in time, If so why?

To change the way you did something in your life.
12 (44.4%)
To save a friend or loved one from something that has happened.
5 (18.5%)
To win the lottery.
3 (11.1%)
To change history.
2 (7.4%)
Just for kicks.
3 (11.1%)
I wouldn't want to go back in time!
2 (7.4%)

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Author Topic: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?  (Read 5530 times)

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Offline Ghost1

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A time machime, holly crap.....imagine how much more we could screw up the world with that.  ter

If you could would you want to go back in time?  Qu


Two scientists claim the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - a giant atom-smashing machine - could open the door to unexpected visitors from the future. The machine, due to come on stream this year, has been constructed at CERN, the European particle physics centre near Geneva. And the scientists' calculations show it is possible the machine will tear a hole in the fabric of space and time, creating a gateway to tomorrow. That means, with sufficiently advanced technology, people from the future might even be able to walk through it. Designed to investigate the origins of the universe, the machine will generate particles with so much energy that scientists are not entirely sure what will happen when they switch the machine on. And now the science bit. One possibility is that microscopic black holes will be created within the LHC. But Russian mathematicians Irina Aref’eva and Igor Volovich point to another scenario. They believe a “wormhole” could open up, linking our time with another in the future. Such a time tunnel would need to be propped open for anyone to step through it. But this could happen if “dark energy” - the mysterious anti-gravity force that causes galaxies to accelerate away from each other - possesses a special “phantom” property. The year 2008 might then become “Year Zero” for future time travellers, since it would only be possible to travel back as far as the first doorway in time. Manipulating such a wormhole to create a viable time machine would take incredibly advanced technology, New Scientist magazine reported - yet this could not be ruled out in the distant future.
It added: “If a combination of fast-moving particles and phantom energy does create a wormhole in Geneva this year, such an advanced civilisation could find it in their history books, pinpoint the moment, and take advantage of their technology to pay us a visit.”


http://thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article771201.ece
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Offline Colleen2510

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RE: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?
« Reply #1 on: Feb 11 2008 - 05:58AM »
Well I can't say that I believe that it can happen. I believe that what has happened is over with and cannot be repeated. Not to say that it doesn't get recorded some place but just as a recording is a recording and cannot be changed without erassing it and redoing it I don't think that we can relive an actual event.  The future has not even happened yet so it is not even recorded any place yet.  I don't think it's possible.

But then...... No one thought that anyone would ever be flying back and forth across the Atlantic Ocean in a big Jet while watching movies on tiny little screens imbedded in the back of semi-comfortable chairs and choosing between 1st and 2nd class either.  So I will wait and see and hope that if it is possible that it will be working before I leave the earth and become a spirit....  :Y:


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Offline Darkone

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RE: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?
« Reply #2 on: Feb 23 2008 - 12:06AM »
 ter    A time machine, I don't think the world is ready for such a thing.  Seems a bit to dangerous!  cho

Offline Ghost1

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RE: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?
« Reply #3 on: Apr 04 2008 - 12:41PM »
Here is a story update, the Hadron Collider, LHC  will be on-line in weeks.......................The first time travellers from the future could materialise on Earth within a few weeks.   cho

Time travellers from the future 'could be here in weeks'

Physicists around the world are excitedly awaiting the start up of the £4.65 billion Large Hadron Collider, LHC - the most powerful atom-smasher ever built - which is supposed to shed new light on the particles and forces at work in the cosmos and reproduce conditions that date to near the Big Bang of creation.1.21 gigawatts of electricity: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in the De Lorean time machine from Back to the Future Prof Irina Aref'eva and Dr Igor Volovich, mathematical physicists at the Steklov Mathematical Institute in Moscow believe that the vast experiment at CERN, the European particle physics centre near Geneva in Switzerland, may turn out to be the world's first time machine, reports New Scientist.  The debut in early summer could provide a landmark because travelling into the past is only possible - if it is possible at all - as far back as the point of creation of the first time machine.

That means 2008 could become "Year Zero" for temporal travel, they argue.

Time travel was born when Albert Einstein's colleague, Kurt Gödel, used Einstein's theory of relativity to show that travel into the past was possible.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?xml=/earth/2008/02/06/scitime106.xml



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Offline Tenbears

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RE: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?
« Reply #4 on: Apr 05 2008 - 05:39PM »
I voted for the Lottery
« Last Edit: Sep 19 2010 - 07:29PM by Tenbears »

Offline Colleen2510

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RE: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?
« Reply #5 on: Apr 06 2008 - 11:08AM »
Can't wait to here what happens with this Ghost1. Once again though I feel that I am not in on the entire story here.


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Offline The Shadow

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RE: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?
« Reply #6 on: Apr 08 2008 - 10:37PM »
Does anyone not wonder would happen if we actually changed our time. I think the world would collapse on itself
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Offline Ghost1

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RE: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?
« Reply #7 on: Jun 29 2008 - 12:54PM »
Here is another update on the Large Hadron Collider, LHC - the most powerful atom-smasher ever created.  This is kind of scary, what happens if it's turned on and doesn't do what they think.  Or makes a huge black hole the swallows earth?    ter

Scientists: Nothing To Fear From Atom-Smasher 
 By DOUGLAS BIRCH
Associated Press Writer

MEYRIN, Switzerland  --  The most powerful atom-smasher ever built could make some bizarre discoveries, such as invisible matter or extra dimensions in space, after it is switched on in August.

But some critics fear the Large Hadron Collider could exceed physicists' wildest conjectures: Will it spawn a black hole that could swallow Earth? Or spit out particles that could turn the planet into a hot dead clump?

Ridiculous, say scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, known by its French initials CERN -- some of whom have been working for a generation on the $5.8 billion collider, or LHC.

"Obviously, the world will not end when the LHC switches on," said project leader Lyn Evans.

David Francis, a physicist on the collider's huge ATLAS particle detector, smiled when asked whether he worried about black holes and hypothetical killer particles known as strangelets.

"If I thought that this was going to happen, I would be well away from here," he said.

The collider basically consists of a ring of supercooled magnets 17 miles in circumference attached to huge barrel-shaped detectors. The ring, which straddles the French and Swiss border, is buried 330 feet underground.

The machine, which has been called the largest scientific experiment in history, isn't expected to begin test runs until August, and ramping up to full power could take months. But once it is working, it is expected to produce some startling findings.

Scientists plan to hunt for signs of the invisible "dark matter" and "dark energy" that make up more than 96 percent of the universe, and hope to glimpse the elusive Higgs boson, a so-far undiscovered particle thought to give matter its mass.

The collider could find evidence of extra dimensions, a boon for superstring theory, which holds that quarks, the particles that make up atoms, are infinitesimal vibrating strings.

The theory could resolve many of physics' unanswered questions, but requires about 10 dimensions -- far more than the three spatial dimensions our senses experience.

The safety of the collider, which will generate energies seven times higher than its most powerful rival, at Fermilab near Chicago, has been debated for years. The physicist Martin Rees has estimated the chance of an accelerator producing a global catastrophe at one in 50 million -- long odds, to be sure, but about the same as winning some lotteries.

By contrast, a CERN team this month issued a report concluding that there is "no conceivable danger" of a cataclysmic event. The report essentially confirmed the findings of a 2003 CERN safety report, and a panel of five prominent scientists not affiliated with CERN, including one Nobel laureate, endorsed its conclusions.

Critics of the LHC filed a lawsuit in a Hawaiian court in March seeking to block its startup, alleging that there was "a significant risk that ... operation of the Collider may have unintended consequences which could ultimately result in the destruction of our planet."

One of the plaintiffs, Walter L. Wagner, a physicist and lawyer, said Wednesday CERN's safety report, released June 20, "has several major flaws," and his views on the risks of using the particle accelerator had not changed.

On Tuesday, U.S. Justice Department lawyers representing the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation filed a motion to dismiss the case.

The two agencies have contributed $531 million to building the collider, and the NSF has agreed to pay $87 million of its annual operating costs. Hundreds of American scientists will participate in the research.

The lawyers called the plaintiffs' allegations "extraordinarily speculative," and said "there is no basis for any conceivable threat" from black holes or other objects the LHC might produce. A hearing on the motion is expected in late July or August.

In rebutting doomsday scenarios, CERN scientists point out that cosmic rays have been bombarding the earth, and triggering collisions similar to those planned for the collider, since the solar system formed 4.5 billion years ago.

And so far, Earth has survived.

"The LHC is only going to reproduce what nature does every second, what it has been doing for billions of years," said John Ellis, a British theoretical physicist at CERN.

Critics like Wagner have said the collisions caused by accelerators could be more hazardous than those of cosmic rays.

Both may produce micro black holes, subatomic versions of cosmic black holes -- collapsed stars whose gravity fields are so powerful that they can suck in planets and other stars.

But micro black holes produced by cosmic ray collisions would likely be traveling so fast they would pass harmlessly through the earth.

Micro black holes produced by a collider, the skeptics theorize, would move more slowly and might be trapped inside the earth's gravitational field -- and eventually threaten the planet.

Ellis said doomsayers assume that the collider will create micro black holes in the first place, which he called unlikely. And even if they appeared, he said, they would instantly evaporate, as predicted by the British physicist Stephen Hawking.

As for strangelets, CERN scientists point out that they have never been proven to exist. They said that even if these particles formed inside the Collider they would quickly break down.

When the LHC is finally at full power, two beams of protons will race around the huge ring 11,000 times a second in opposite directions. They will travel in two tubes about the width of fire hoses, speeding through a vacuum that is colder and emptier than outer space.

Their trajectory will be curved by supercooled magnets -- to guide the beams around the rings and prevent the packets of protons from cutting through the surrounding magnets like a blowtorch.

The paths of these beams will cross, and a few of the protons in them will collide, at a series of cylindrical detectors along the ring. The two largest detectors are essentially huge digital cameras, each weighing thousands of tons, capable of taking millions of snapshots a second.

Each year the detectors will generate 15 petabytes of data, the equivalent of a stack of CDs 12 miles tall. The data will require a high speed global network of computers for analysis.

Wagner and others filed a lawsuit to halt operation of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, or RHIC, at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York state in 1999. The courts dismissed the suit.

The leafy campus of CERN, a short drive from the shores of Lake Geneva, hardly seems like ground zero for doomsday. And locals don't seem overly concerned. Thousands attended an open house here this spring.

"There is a huge army of scientists who know what they are talking about and are sleeping quite soundly as far as concerns the LHC," said project leader Evans.
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Offline Ghost1

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RE: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?
« Reply #8 on: Sep 05 2008 - 05:26PM »
Worldwide....People fear the world will end next Wednesday  (9/10/08)

Scientists working on the world's biggest machine are being besieged by phone calls and emails from people who fear the world will end next Wednesday, when the gigantic atom smasher starts up.

The Large Hadron Collider — designed to replicate conditions in the universe immediately after the Big Bang and due to be switched on in 5 days — is being challenged by a last-minute lawsuit at the European Court for Human Rights.

Opponents of the Collider are afraid its ability to smash atoms at such high speeds that it will generate temperatures of one trillion degrees centigrade will create a mini-black hole that could “tear the earth apart,”

[float=right][/float]
The Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, where particles will begin to circulate around its 17 mile circumference tunnel next week, will recreate energies not seen since the universe was very young, when particles smash together at near the speed of light.

Such is the angst that the American Nobel prize winning physicist Frank Wilczek of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has even had death threats, said Prof Brian Cox of Manchester University, adding: "Anyone who thinks the LHC will destroy the world is a t---."

The head of public relations, James Gillies, says he gets tearful phone calls, pleading for the £4.5 billion machine to stop. "They phone me and say: "I am seriously worried. Please tell me that my children are safe," said Gillies. Emails also arrive every day that beg for reassurance that the world will not end, he explained.  Others are more aggressive. "There are a number who say: "You are evil and dangerous and you are going to destroy the world." "I find myself getting slightly angry, not because people are getting in touch but the fact they have been driven to do that by what is nonsense. What we are doing is enriching humanity, not putting it at risk." There have also been legal attempts to halt the start up. The remarkable outpouring of concern about turning on the experiment, the most ambitious in history, comes as a new report concludes that it poses no threat to mankind

Since 1994, when the collider was first mooted by the multi-national European nuclear research organisation (CERN), dogged doomsayers have claimed that there would be a small but real risk that an unstoppable cataclysm would take place.

Many of the emails received by Gillies cite a gloomy book - Our Final Century?: Will the Human Race Survive the Twenty-first Century? - written by Lord Rees, astronomer royal and president of the Royal Society.

"My book has been misquoted in one or two places," Lord Rees said yesterday. "I would refer you to the up-to-date safety study."

The new report published today provides the most comprehensive evidence available to confirm that nature's own cosmic rays regularly produce more powerful particle collisions than those planned within the LHC.

The LHC Safety Assessment Group has reviewed and updated a study first completed in 2003, which dispels fears of universe-gobbling black holes and of other possibly dangerous new forms of matter, and confirms that the switch-on will be safe.

The report, 'Review of the Safety of LHC Collisions', published in the Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics, proves that if particle collisions at the LHC had the power to destroy the Earth, we would never have been given the chance to worry about the LHC, because regular interactions with more energetic cosmic rays would already have destroyed the Earth.

The Safety Assessment Group writes, "Nature has already conducted the equivalent of about a hundred thousand LHC experimental programmes on Earth - and the planet still exists. "The Group compares the rates of cosmic rays that bombard Earth to show that hypothetical black holes or strangelets, that have raised fears in some, will pose no threat. As the Group writes, "Each collision of a pair of protons in the LHC will release an amount of energy comparable to that of two colliding mosquitoes, so any black hole produced would be much smaller than those known to astrophysicists." They also say that such microscopic black holes could not grow dangerously. As for the equally hypothetical strangelets, the review uses recent experimental measurements at the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, New York, to prove that they will not be produced in the LHC. The collider is designed to seek out new particles including the long-awaited Higgs boson responsible for making things weigh what they do, the possible source of gravity called dark matter, as well as probe the differences between matter and antimatter.






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Offline ghostlight

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RE: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?
« Reply #9 on: Sep 05 2008 - 05:45PM »
CRAP!!! Now I'm never gonna find Old Union cemetery!!!!

Offline Ghost1

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Re: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?
« Reply #10 on: Sep 09 2008 - 06:52PM »
Stephen Hawking: Large Hadron Collider vital for humanity

Here is a short video explaining what the LHC will do once it is turned on tomorrow (9/10/08)
http://link.brightcove.com/services/link/bcpid1488655367/bctid1466839008

Prof Hawking said the £4.4bn machine, in which scientists are about to recreate conditions just after the Big Bang, is "vital if the human race is not to stultify and eventually die out." And he sought to ease fears that the machine could have apocalyptic effects. "The world will not come to an end when the LHC turns on," Prof Hawking said, adding: "The LHC is absolutely safe." Scientists at the CERN research centre in Switzerland are aiming to use the machine to gain a better understanding of the birth and structure of the universe, and to fill gaps in our knowledge of physics. They hope that by recreating the moments after the Big Bang - the massive explosion thought to have created the universe - the experiment will make clearer what the universe is made of, what makes it expand and also to predict its future. Prof Hawking, the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, said: "The LHC will increase the energy at which we can study particle interactions by a factor of four." However, he doubts that the machine will have the power to unravel some of the universe's more elusive secrets such as the putative Higgs boson particle - thought to have given mass to all other particles. Prof Hawking said he has placed a bet of $100 that the scientists won't find the Higgs boson - the so-called "God particle." "Another discovery that we might make is superpartners, partners for all the particles we know ... they could make up the mysterious dark matter that holds galaxies together," he told BBC Radio 4. "Whatever the LHC finds or fails to find, the results will tell us a lot about the structure of the universe," Prof Hawking added. However he dismissed speculation that the world could be put in grave danger by the force of the experiment. "The LHC is absolutely safe. If the collisions in the LHC produced a micro black hole - and this is unlikely - it would just evaporate away again, producing a correctoristic pattern of particles," he said. "Collisions releasing greater energy occur millions of times a day in the earth's atmosphere and nothing terrible happens. The world will not come to an end when the LHC turns on." However he pointed out that if the LHC were indeed to create minor black holes, his own work on the subject could be verified and he chould receive the highest acclaim in the field. He said: "If the LHC were to produce little black holes, I don't think there is any doubt I would get a Nobel Prize, if they showed the properties I predict. "However I think the the probability that the LHC has enough energy to produce little black holes is less than 1 per cent - so I'm not holding my breath." Asked whether the results of the LHC experiment would offer immediate practical benefits for our day-to-day lives, Prof Hawking urged patience. He said: "Throughout history, people have studied pure science from a desire to understand the universe, rather than practical applications for commercial gain. But their discoveries later turned out to have great practical benefits. "It is difficult to see an economic return from research at the LHC, but that doesn't mean there wont be any." Prof Hawking made clear that the LHC project is one of the most important in the history of scientific endeavour. Asked to choose between it and the space program, he said: "That is like asking which of my children I would choose to sacrifice. "Both the LHC and the Space program are vital if the human race is not to stultify and eventually die out. Together they cost less than one tenth of a per cent of world GDP. If the human race can not afford this, then it doesn't deserve the epithet 'human'."
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Offline Ghost1

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Re: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?
« Reply #11 on: Sep 10 2008 - 09:10AM »
Largest particle collider conducts successful test .....And the world is still here, So Far?

The first part of the test went off fine, they sent a beam of protons at 11,000 times a second around the tunnel.  There next test is to do it in the other direction.  Then after that is the BIG one, they plan on sending them both directions at once and making them collide to try to duplicate the "Big Bang"..... I think this might be the test that is a bit on the dangerous side?  So the world is safe......for now?

...

GENEVA - The world's largest particle collider passed its first major test by firing a beam of protons around a 17-mile (27-kilometer) underground ring Wednesday in what scientists hope is the next great step to understanding the makeup of the universe

Now that the beam has been successfully tested in a clockwise direction, CERN plans to send it counterclockwise. Eventually two beams will be fired in opposite directions with the aim of recreating conditions a split second after the big bang, which scientists theorize was the massive explosion that created the universe.

The collider is designed to push the proton beam close to the speed of light, whizzing 11,000 times a second around the tunnel.



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Offline MusicianMommy

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Re: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?
« Reply #12 on: Sep 13 2008 - 03:38AM »
Wonder if they plan on keeping it running?  Like, for the next 7 years or so...  wh
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Offline Exodus

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Re: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?
« Reply #13 on: Oct 24 2009 - 01:50PM »
Whatever happened with this?  Updates, black holes?!  What?!?!?!?  :X

Offline The Shadow

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Re: SCIENTIST - one step closer to creating a time machine?
« Reply #14 on: Oct 26 2009 - 07:44PM »
It is up and running. It also had a few major failures and almost blew the first few weeks it was in service
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